Category Archives: Editorials

Jason and Halloween

When it comes to Halloween and horror icons Michael Myers readily (and rightly so) comes to mind. The impact Myers holds over both the genre and the holiday as a whole now spans the gulf of generations, and, if his 2018 successful return to the silver screen is any indication, will go on to do so way after you and I are finally laid to rest. Michael Myers is as timeless as Halloween itself.

image via Screen Rant

It’s safe to say he is the Halloween Slasher.

There is the expectation for me though. Not to downcast the legacy of Michael Myers but I was introduced to another slasher icon on Halloween and it left an enormous imprint on my (back then) young mind.

It was the night of Halloween and trick-or-treating was in full effect. We ran door to door to glean the sweet goodies friendly neighbors had to give us greedy monsters. We wound up at a friend of my parents’ house and during my boredom of waiting for the adults to shut up so we could rush back out in the twilight to fill my bag with more (so much more) candy my wandering eyes stole a glance at the TV.

image courtesy of Paramount

It was a forbidden thing and out of the warm guilt of taboo a face rose prominently to forever fascinate the darkest regions of my imagination.

Given the title of this, you’re sure to have guessed who I saw on the glowing screen. Jason’s rampage across the TV held me rooted in place, absolutely transfixed on the crimson spectacle before me. I had not seen a single Jason film up to that point, and always managed to admire the covers whenever I was at a video store, but in those brief little moments of viewing, I was enthralled. Given the chance to stay and finish the movie or got forth to trick-or-treat more I probably would have stayed behind. I wanted to see it end! I wanted to see Jason slaughter more!

To me sequels meant nothing. I wasn’t even sure which part I was watching. Plot wasn’t important. To me, there was only Jason and his wrath. That mask was burned into my memory.

image courtesy of Paramount

Back then there was still a whole world of horror movies left in the wild for me to go and discover. Some I saw overseas while living in Russia, some over here, and a few I saw in Finland. It’s been an international adventure for me.

Thanks to VHS, DVD, and Blu-ray I’ve collected most of these series along the way. Like everyone else I have my favorites to watch every Halloween. And still, after all these years later and no matter where I’ve found myself in the world the haunting mask of Jason will be seen in my home come Halloween.

image courtesy of Paramount

Jason is by far my favorite slasher icon. Maybe because I saw him in such a secret way because I damn well knew my folks wouldn’t want me to watch a Friday the 13th picture, believe me, every time I went to the movie store I tried to rent them!

image courtesy of Paramount

Or maybe I just connect with the character in some scary way. But we all have that one evil monster out there that we love and root for.

From all of us at Nightmare Nostalgia to you who help keep horror alive, have a Happy Halloween! And please share with us your Halloween memories and favorite horror icons to watch this time of year.

Dracula! Bela Lugosi’s Dark Spell

In honor of Bela Lugosi’s birthday (A day late I’m afraid, but better late than never), I’ve sat down to treat myself once more to the fantastical whimsy of the horror film that really started it all, Dracula. No denying the German expressionism films were the pioneers of horror cinema, but Dracula was the very first ‘talky’ horror film. 

The fog crowded scenes and hypnotic visuals of the Count’s foreboding and far-away realm could now be heard as well as seen, and they used sound to their advantage for this eerie new project. Rattling carriages drawn by horses, creaking doors, and hissing bats. Audiences sat dumbfounded by all they heard. It brought the night-shaded horror of Transylvania straight to them. And there was no escape. Horror had entered a brave new era.

There was no going back. Dracula opened a secret door and a monsoon rush of sensational horror films has flooded through ever since. 

From the cracking whine of a camera in Texas Chainsaw Massacre, the tolling of the bell in Hellraiser, a sing-song lullaby in Nightmare on Elm Street, and, last but certainly not least, the iconic sound Jason makes all stand out in our blood-splattered minds. These sounds immediately take us back to the chills and thrills of the films and are as iconic as the monsters we love.

Dracula began it all.

It’s so easy to get wrapped up in each little minute detail of the film, but I’m no expert on the matter, just an avid fan. Somehow rewatching it this time around reminds me of the first time I ever sat my butt down to experience this macabre treasure. 

image courtesy of Universal, Bela Lugosi ‘Dracula’

Any of you remember those drop-dead sexy VHS covers Universal released a few decades back for each of their Classic Monsters library?

image via Amazon

One Halloween my mom got me both Dracula and Frankenstein, both of which I’m still proud to say I still own 

I was in 1st Grade and Castlevania had just released earlier that year and was my favorite game. Mom thought it was high time her little Manic watched the very original Dracula movie. I’d seen so many different movies with Dracula in them but never the initial film. That Halloween all that changed. 

I don’t think I moved or fidgeted once. I may have not even blinked! I was transfixed to the glowing screen, it being the only light allowed to remain on, as the living shadows of this gothic epic played out spectrally before my eyes. Sure I was a young kid but the film’s unique majesty and gripping narrative weren’t lost on me. 

To The Prince of Darkness

Now at the end of Bela Lugosi’s birthday, I lift a glass to his eternal legacy. A cheer of thanks and of memories to him.

Against the odds of English not being his native tongue Lugosi pain-stakingly pronounced each word spoken with adjective deliberate concentration. It gave the Count his often mimicked manner of speech and deepened his mesmerizing effect over horror history .

So the imitated accent of Dracula was in fact Lugosi’s Hungarian one. It served the part well.

image via belalugosi.com

Lugosi was not the first choice for Dracula, nor was he even the second. A fact that pained the actor considering how he’d played the part on stage and mastered the role to damn near perfection. So when the time came for him to don the vampire’s cape Lugosi fought and earned his right to bring Bram Stoker’s legendary nosferatu to cinematic life.

As grand and wondrous as he is in Dracula that’s not, in fact, my favorite of his various roles. That honor goes to his hideously fun part in Son of Frankenstein where Lugosi ditches the cloak for a huched back. Playing the nefarious Igor, Bela Lugosi shines and steals the show!

image courtesy of Universal, Bela Lugosi ‘Son of Frankenstein’

I feel that Igor allowed the man to show his more playful side. Even though his face is hidden beneath a ratty beard and layered of makeup the man can’t help but bristle with fun and life. He never loses that sinister sparkle in his beady, little eyes nor that vicious smile.

You know what? Stop right here. If you’ve not seen Son of Frankenstein then I insist you go do yourself a favor and correct that right away, my Nasties. Go watch Uncle Lugosi have the time of his life!

Bela Lugosi had both magnetism and charisma. Not unlike the genius of Lon Chaney before him, Lugosi could captivate people on a whim.

image courtesy of Universal, Bela Lugosi ‘Dracula’

Those who knew Lugosi said he carried an unearthly mystique about him. He would enter a room and every eye would gravitationally be drawn to him.

He was indeed Dracula, so much so that he was even buried in a cape echoing back to his most treasured role. 

Hope you’re enjoying this witching season, my Nasties. And I hope that in your Halloween movie watching you have a chance to pay respect to Lugosi’s devilish spell over horror history.

Here’s The Story Behind That Blonde Michael Myers Mask From “Halloween 4”

Halloween 4 was released theatrically around the time I was old enough to comprehend that a NEW Halloween film with Michael Myers was within my grasp. Being as how yours truly was 6-years-old at the time, apparently the maternal parental unit didn’t think it was a great idea to take me to the theater for the long-awaited return of The Shape. With the unfortunate flop of Season of the Witch, fans bitched and whined enough to bring back their pale-faced Haddonfield homicidal maniac. Now, again I was six, and none of that shit ran through my head as I had only seen the prior films with my Dad- the biggest Halloween fan in the universe. And I didn’t give two shits about any of that fanboy/girl bullshit. I just really wanted to see this film! Alas, pretty sure the mother didn’t want to deal with the dirty looks from theater patrons and opted for Oliver and Company instead.

BULLSHIT. K, it was an ok movie but it was lacking some serious George P. Wilbur malarkey.

Anyways, I got my fix a few months after the release at a birthday sleepover. My older, and very snotty cousin was turning eleven. Myself, being only six, stuck out and clearly didn’t belong there with the pre-teen crowd. However, because of family politics she was forced to invite me. Which was fine with me because I was hanging out with the big girls! Upon my arrival, my uncle pulled me to the side and had stated he stopped at the video store for some late-night entertainment for us girls. He pulls out A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master, and: TADA! Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers; stating that he had heard I was really wanting to see this and got it JUST FOR ME!

And I’ve watched it about 600 times since.

Now, let’s get down to business. If you’ve seen Halloween 4 as many times I have, you know of what I speak when it comes to the scene that sticks out like a sore thumb. Ahh yes, the blonde-haired Michael Myers in the schoolhouse that it seemed everyone in the audiences caught immediately yet somehow got past the cast, crew, and everyone in the editing studio. However, just in case you need a refresher, here’s the clip in question:

If you ever wondered what in the bleach-blonde fuck that was about, you’re definitely not alone and have the mystery solved for you. Several stories have made the rounds giving an explanation for the California fun- in- the- sun Myers, however, the one that rings the most truth is that it was simply a mistake from the crew and budget restraints didn’t allow for a reshoot. According to the January 88′ issue of Gorezone magazine and then confirmed via Michael-Myers.net, Don Post Studios was commissioned to make a slew of Myers’ masks for the movie. I’m guessing the people in charge had never seen a Halloween film, which actually sounds really irresponsible if that were the case, because the studios had sent the film a set of “pink masks with white hair”?!

Any who, the make-up coordinators paint over this pink monstrosity with white paint, (which explains the really PALE version this time around) and the hair brown to get the desired look. In regards to the school-scene, what you’re seeing is the ACTUAL unconverted mask. Why it was just sitting around on set, and no one had noticed that, “hey, this doesn’t look right“, might be the biggest mystery here.

But that boils and ghouls, is pretty much the sum of it. Just a blunder from the production crew and restricted shoot guidelines. Even so, it still serves as a fun, little laughable moment in what is a truly great sequel in the franchise.


Now that you’ve made it this far, I’d like to to take this opportunity to thank all of you for reading and sharing my crap for the past few years as Nightmare Nostalgia has been honored by gracing Feedspot’s Top 100 Horror Blogs and Websites For Horror Fans on the Internet! What I do is from pure passion and my desire to use the blog scene to spread positivity, fun things to read and reminisce on, and talk about horror film culture is my total pleasure and will be doing it until life says I can’t anymore. Thank you everyone and Happy Halloween Month!